Like Us On Facebook
Facebook Pagelike Widget

Month: December 2017

December 31, 2017

2017 Comeback Season Awards

In our current epoch of rap music, it can feel as if every single day is “Comeback Season” (or COMEBACK SZN, or CMBK SZN, or some other variation of dropping vowels, consonants, etc). This is silly to me for a few reasons. The most clear being the thought that a single day can constitute a season. A season is god damn season. We have four of them. I’m using “We” in the universal way because we are all bound by seasons because we exist on the same time-space continuum. So when I’m scrolling through Instagram and see my peers shouting CMBK SZN day after day, I want to slap them with a calendar and shout back “JULIUS CAESAR DIDN’T DIE SO YOU COULD DISRESPECT HIS SEASONS”.

The other reason, and perhaps the more fascinating, CMBK SZN is dumb as hell is the majority people claiming it’s their comeback never had a chance of failing. It’s mainly used by people who have experienced incredible success while entertaining a zero-chance possibility of ever returning to a place where a comeback is necessary.

Also, Can we agree it was Aubrey “Drake” Graham who started this phenomena? It seems like it was Drake. It had to have been Drake. 100% Aubrey Graham. 

Drake saying he is having a comeback season is like Matt Centrowitz claiming it’s his comeback season after winning an Olympic Gold. Something I have no proof of, but something I’ve never been so sure of in my life.

Ok, so the gist is no one can see who really enjoys a comeback season because of all the noise from people who hold a false narrative of oppression and failure. I believe two people in the world of running enjoyed a true “Comeback Season”.

Sara Hall

In 2016, Sara Hall dropped out of the Olympic Marathon Trials. Her chance at making her first Olympic team vanished. I also dropped out of the Olympic Marathon Trials, but I wasn’t that devastated because I had a bunch of friends there and my focus immediately shifted to tacos and Coronas. I’m sure she was devastated because she had an honest shot at making the team. We were at different places in our life, and that was fine.

Sara Hall needed a comeback season in 2017. She delivered one with a personal bests in the half marathon, marathon, and a national championship in the marathon.

Her 69:37 performance at the Copenhagen Half Marathon set her up nicely for a 2:27:21 marathon personal best at the Frankfurt Marathon. To cap off her legitimate CMBK SZN, she dominated the U.S Marathon Championships while taking the victory earlier this month.

THIS *CLAP EMOJI* WAS  *CLAP EMOJI* A *CLAP EMOJI* COMEBACK

Chris Derrick

This may seem like a stretch, and it probably is, but I think CD had a 2017 Comeback Season. After a year where he missed the start of the Olympic Marathon Trials due to injury and then couldn’t get into the shape he needed to be in to truly compete at the 10,000-meter Trials, one of our brightest talents was facing some hardships. This is the part of the story where he holes himself up in a room, literally takes out his degree from Stanford, hangs in on the wall, and creates an algorithm for success in 2017.

His formula worked – delivering personal bests at the New York City Half Marathon (61:12) and then guiding him to a 2:12:50 marathon debut (2nd American) at the Chicago Marathon. Chris showed he has a future in the marathon and formulas. Hell yeah, Chris.

I hope I showed not everyone can equally experience a Comeback Season. You cannot have a Comeback Season after one or two bad races. No – you have to suffer through a year of shit to deserve a Citius Comeback Season Award Tour Award. I apologize to Sara and Chris if I made their 2016 year out to be worse than it was. Because, in reality, it was probably a great year filled with family, friends, and all that nice stuff. We probably attribute too much “success” to running, but whatever. We can tackle that in 2018.

December 29, 2017

CITIUS MAG Christmas Lights Special with Syracuse’s Kevin James

Come on a little running tour with Syracuse’s Kevin James in Pennsylvania as we explore some of the best Christmas lights.

December 24, 2017

Christmas Wishes: The Matchups We Want to See in 2018

These are the the races and match-ups that we want to see from the track and field community in 2018 – a year without a world championship or Olympics.

December 21, 2017

I ate Donald Trump’s McDonald’s dinner and then ran: Here are the sad results

Ryan Sterner decided to try and eat President Donald Trump’s dinner of two Big Macs, two Filet-O-Fish and a chocolate shake from McDonalds before running.

December 19, 2017

CITIUS MAG – Quote of the Year: ‘FUCK YES’

Just two words by Shalane Flanagan perfectly captured the emotions surrounding one of the best moments of the year for U.S. distance running.

December 19, 2017

Why It’s Foolish to Count Molly Huddle Out in Boston

While a lot of the attention for the 2018 Boston Marathon has been focused on Shalane Flanagan vs. Jordan Hasay, do not count out Molly Huddle.

December 18, 2017

Welcome to Grindfest – Watch Live on Friday

If the best runners in the country got together on one track for a progression run, who would last the longest? We’ll find out on Friday.

December 18, 2017

U.S. Citizenship Still “The Dream” For Edward Cheserek

After a historic NCAA career at Oregon, Edward Cheserek is now chasing his professional running dreams, most of which his dream of representing the USA.

December 18, 2017

What happened this weekend? Yuki Kawauchi Had A Better Year Than Most U.S. Marathoners

Japanese marathoner Yuki Kawauchi may have put together a better year of running the marathon than the top American runners.

December 14, 2017

After NFL Wide Receiver Claims Ghost Tainted Pee, Russia Nods in Solidarity

After serving a 4-game suspension for a positive PED test, Jets receiver Jeremy Kerley is back & has some spooky theories on how his urine became tainted.

December 13, 2017

When will Galen Rupp run a fast marathon?

Galen Rupp has an Olympic medal. He’s won a marathon major. He’s won the marathon trials. He’s yet to run to what everyone believes is his true potential.

December 12, 2017

Remembering York Coach Joe Newton

Scott Milling, a former runner at York and Notre Dame, shares his favorite memories of legendary York cross country coach Joe Newton.

December 12, 2017

A Certain Under-Investigation Coach’s Christmas List (PARODY)

A Christmas list of a certain coach that is under investigation. Whether he was naughty or nice is up to the discretion of USADA.

December 11, 2017

Boston Marathon Delivers With Incredible U.S. Fields For 2018

The 2018 Boston Marathon will feature Shalane Flanagan, Jordan Hasay, Galen Rupp, Molly Huddle Dathan Ritzenhein, Deena Kastor and more.

December 8, 2017

183.4: FINAL EPISODE

The final installment of the HOKA NAZ ELITE documentary “183.4” is live! The documentary follows the team’s journey as they prepare for several marathons.

December 7, 2017

The Beauty and Carnage of the Marathon

I haven’t come within 10 miles of running the marathon distance. I have, however, spent the last month of my life basically bathing in the marathon culture. I was at the finish line of the New York City Marathon when Shalane did the damn thing. And I spent last weekend hobnobbing around Sacramento for the 35th California International Marathon with a press credential hanging around my neck granting me more access than I rightfully deserved.

From the outside looking in, the whole point of a marathon for most people was to just finish. If that’s the case, then a marathon was only a few steps removed from being a hot dog eating contest. There had to be more.

When I got to the starting line of the CIM it was still dark, not yet 6 AM. The PA was blaring Imagine Dragons at a skull-shattering volume, but no one seemed to mind.

I caught whiffs of conversations — stories of preparation or lack thereof. There were runners sitting on the curb, applying what my nose positively identified as Icy Hot, or some other menthol knock-off. But Icy Hot wasn’t the only goo. I saw runners rubbing various shmears and semi-solids into any nook or cranny that carried even a scintilla of a doubt about its ability to stay chafe-free. I’m positive most of the product names ended in GLIDE.  Overall, the atmosphere was jovial. Selfie sticks and chuckling and groups in matching t-shirts abound.

The only place where things felt panicked, maybe even desperate, was near the port-o-potties.

In New York, I heard rumors of the Verrazano Bridge running yellow with urine by the time the 50,000 some runners clear the area. In Sacramento, the announcer repeatedly warned people to please respect the neighbors and keep their pre-race ones and twos in the port-o-potties.

I imagine the warning provided a chicken and egg type moment for some of the more refined folks. Had the thought of skipping the line and shitting in someone’s yard occurred to them before the announcer made them privy to the practice?

My assignment for the race was to sit in the elite women’s lead van and observe. We had the back doors swung wide open for maximum visibility and relied on bungee cords stretched within an inch of their lives to keep them ajar.

The marathon doesn’t really get interesting until the element of disaster knocks on the door. This starts to happen at roughly mile ten. And since both men and women started at the same time, the women’s lead van was a perfect vantage point for the back-of-the-pack men’s race (also, Sara Hall was the only female runner we saw that day, as she ended up winning by over two whole minutes).

Now, I’ve seen folks having bad races before: someone maybe 30 seconds behind at the end of a steeplechase or having a little lie down at the end of a 10K. But nothing compares to the face of a marathoner having a bad day. Waking up in the middle of mile 16 and realizing that you, covered in salt, mouth like a dried sponge, still have ten miles to go is probably something not too far off from a religious experience.

We passed runners with sullen, lifeless faces, the skin around their eyes a bright pink that gave the impression of a freshly powdered corpse. I watched one guy try to suck whatever he could out of a GU packet and then nearly vomit it back up. Around mile 20 we passed a man covered in his own filth. Later we learned he had shit his pants at mile eight and went on to run somewhere around 2:16. A pretty decent trade-off, if you ask me.

We passed the runners who called it quits. Some sitting on the curb holding an ailing body part, others walking with their hands on their hips, looking for answers in the pavement beneath their feet. When we went by our driver apologized for not being able to pick them up, but assured them that the “meat wagon” was coming.

Other people we passed were having far more impressive outings. There were runners who, at mile 20, looked like they had just started their engines. They had the wide-eyed look of an animal in a trap, probably hungry, probably closer to death than they knew but running with a ravenous energy in an attempt to jump-start their depleted limbs.

And then there was the finish line.

Some people were jubilant, but most just kind of stopped running — like Forrest Gump in the end zone. They had vacant looks on their faces, stood bleary and blinking, coming to terms with the trauma they had just inflicted on their bodies.

At the end of it all, while we CITIUS boys were making our way back to the elite athlete area, I looked at them and without a hint of irony said, “I’m tired.”

We sat around drinking coffee in the cafeteria as the elite runners started to filter in. Limping, wet, perhaps in shock, we greeted a handful of them, spoke earnestly with the ones we knew and congratulated anyone that approached our table.

I couldn’t pretend to understand what they went through. A washed-up runner cursing his cramped calves after a 5K fun run, and a woman who can’t walk up stairs because she brought her body to the brink and continued to burn are two completely different things.

I now understand the fundamental difference between running marathons and running anything shorter. There didn’t look to be anything inherently fun about running a marathon. Stringing together a good training block can be fun. But the fun really isn’t in the 20 mile long runs or the solo workouts in the pitch black morning. The fun is filling in those consecutive days in the running log, maybe enjoying a beer afterward and feeling like you earned it.

Any fun you were probably having wears off somewhere between a week before the race and right before the gun goes off. I saw the faces of every elite athlete before the start. Existential dread could be one way to describe it, a duck on the pond could be another.

A lot of fuss was made about the bathrooms in the elite staging area. These 100 or so elite athletes were all fawning over the 20 pristine port-o-potties they had to themselves. If you’re engaging in a supposedly fun activity but the best thing you can say about it is that the bathrooms were great, maybe you should reconsider your definition of fun.

The entertainment value of a marathon — the crux of this entire thing — is best compared, I think, to the episode of Seinfeld called “The Dealership.”

Do you remember? This is the episode where Kramer and some poor schmuck of a salesman see how far they can take the car before it runs out of gas.

In the beginning, the car salesman doesn’t understand what Kramer is doing. He’s nervous. Agitated, even.

“How low are you gonna go?”

“Oh, I’ve been below the slash a number of times. This is nothing. Just put it out of your mind.”

Eventually, the car salesman comes around, screaming that he’s never felt so alive, that they can’t stop now, that they need to see how far this thing goes on empty. To him, it was life-changing.

That’s the only reasonable answer I could come up with. The fun isn’t in the act itself but seeing what you can find on your way to the bottom of the well. Maybe it’s a gear you never knew existed. Maybe it’s a dark place where you question every decision you ever made. But in the end, if you make it to the end, you’ll have accomplished something. Was it fun? Was it worth it? I guess that’s for you to decide.

After the race, I hung around Sacramento waiting for my flight, feeling inadequate. All around me people had just participated in a facet of the running world that I was only partner to. It was a self-imposed exile, I suppose, as nothing is stopping me from running a marathon other than thinking that I might die if I tried. But slowly, over the hours waiting for my plane, I made up my mind. I became Kramer’s car salesman: bearing witness to this crazed phenomenon, I desperately wanted to partake and see, finally, how far I could go before the needle breaks off.

December 6, 2017

Book Review and Author Interview: The Complete History of Cross-Country Running

The Complete History of Cross-Country
Running: From the Nineteenth Century to the Present Day

by Andrew Boyd Hutchinson
Publication on January 16, 2018 (pre-order available from Amazon.com)

How can cross country have a history? It’s such a simple sport. We race from here to there, regardless of what footing or obstacles are in the way. It has to be as old as humanity itself. And if you believed that, as I did before reading this book, you would be wrong.

Cross country running in the way that we now know it came from a game called “hares and hounds”, a sort of a reverse anthropomorphism of the upper-class foxhunt, played by young men at England’s schools and universities in the 19th century. That is where Hutchinson’s book begins, and from there it goes on a wild run over hill and dale. It follows the development of the sport from quirky intramurals to university and club teams and national and international competition, as it spread out over the globe.

Books exist to trace the history of running, and of track and field, and of marathoning, but until now none have traced the history of cross country. Hutchinson did a massive amount of research to unearth stories of long-forgotten athletes and races that illustrate the colorful history of a sport that still defies standardization, and he covers every part of it that you can think of (plus plenty you won’t until you read it).

First-time author Hutchinson avoids the potential pitfall in an extensive work like this, a presentation that is encyclopedic rather than narrative. Fittingly for a book about cross country it’s long. It is organized by decades with a deep look at a feature race in each chapter. If there’s a criticism, it’s that the broad scope of the book allowed Hutchinson to occasionally miss minor details that would give a broader understanding (example: a runner identified merely as “E.A. Montague” is in fact Aubrey Montague, whose letters to his mother from the 1924 Olympics narrate Chariots of Fire). The book is best consumed like one of those epic Ken Burns documentaries: one episode at a time.

The book has not yet hit the market and won’t until a few weeks after Christmas, but pre-order is available. If the runner on your shopping list is willing to wait a few weeks (even if that runner is you), I heartily recommend this book as a gift for fans of every stripe.

I asked Hutchinson a few questions about his efforts.

Squire: This was a massive effort of research and writing. What inspired you to take it on?

Hutchinson: In 2012 I was in my fourth year as a high school history teacher (simultaneously pursuing a Master of Liberal Arts at Stanford where they needed an “undiscovered topic of personal interest” for my dissertation), and I was coaching a team of 60 cross-country athletes for the school.

In November that year, as I was preparing the team yearbook for our cross-country season, I wanted to include some sport history for context. Couldn’t find anything definitive. A few hobbyist’s websites, Wikipedia had about three total sentences (a stub! It even mentioned cross-country in the Olympics, which was new info to me, and sounded awesome), and a few really enticing PDFs on the LA87 site.

I was shocked. I had grown up reading the “Illustrated History of Football” and the like, but figured every major sport had to have a volume sitting on the library shelf. There wasn’t one for cross-country. So I decided to take time away from teaching, use my savings to live frugally, start at Stanford’s library, and become the expert needed to write the story myself. What transpired over the course of the next few years was this book, and candidly, now seeing how much time and effort was needed for research, I know why it never happened before.

I wrote it chronologically, and each decade seemed more extensive than the last. Many Friday evenings and weekend afternoons were sacrificed spent writing, and I eventually came back to teaching…Supplementing that job working the front desk at a local gym at 5 in the morning so I could spend a few hours before school writing without being disturbed too much. There were a lot of 12 hour days, but the outcome was absolutely worth it.

Squire: You said you were surprised to discover that cross country had once been in the Olympics. What were some of the bigger “gee, I didn’t know that” moments in research? And what were the most epic races that you never knew had taken place?

Hutchinson: I quickly learned that USA Track and Field (and therefore most reputable bodies along with them) had erroneously recorded the first U.S. Cross Country National Championship as being in 1890. This has been the result of Spalding’s Sports Almanac a short time after the turn of the century, and they unknowingly wiped out seven years of official championships prior to that year. It wasn’t until I started at that year of the championship and discovered in news articles that it was the seventh year of running it that it caused me to go back and verify.

That time period also had some gaps in the championship record, which were the result of a lawsuit between the organization that hosted the “Team” national championship in the spring, and the New York Athletic Club, which hosted the “Individual” championship in the fall. The end result destroyed both iterations of the event and it disappeared in the 1890s for awhile. Very reminiscent of the talk about Foot Locker and NXN by today’s audience, although there have been no lawsuits… just further proof that history always repeats itself.

One race-related nugget uncovered was the secret success of Emil Zatopek as a cross-country runner, which had been almost completely forgotten up until a few years ago. His appearance at the “Cross de L’Humanité” in France saw upwards of 70,000 spectators, and Zatopek didn’t always win! (The biggest shock of all). His appearance in XC, along with Kip Keino and Jim Ryun also running 10K XC during their prime were surprising tidbits that had been overlooked before.

Squire: These days runners tend to specialize even more than they used to, but almost no one specializes in cross country. Was there a runner you discovered who was dominant in cross country but otherwise very little-known?

Hutchinson: Pat Porter fit this profile. Here was a guy who ran NCAA DII for Adams State, came up at a time with the Salazars and the Herb Lindsays and the Craig Virgins and absolutely DOMINATED cross-country. For nearly 20 years he was a podium finisher domestically, and internationally did well despite facing raw African talent and very good European talent. No one else came close.

These days you’ve got Chris Derrick, Garrett Heath, and to a lesser extent Joe Gray and Max King— guys who train in the mud and trails and throw down on the tracks and roads occasionally, but aren’t winning major marathons or Olympic medals.

The U.S. women have done better to preserve the ideology that cross-country is a worthy competition tool to find stardom elsewhere. Molly Huddle, Jenny Simpson, Shalane Flanagan have shown this, as did the Deena Kastors and Lynn Jennings of yesteryear.

Squire: I hear all kinds of gimmicks thrown around for bringing the elite international side of cross country back to prominence, but to me the essential and timeless parts of cross country are team competition and a difficult course. Do you have any thoughts or ideas?

Hutchinson: Winter Olympic inclusion.

The IAAF is in favor, but the IOC maintains any sport for consideration must be practiced on “snow or ice”.

Instead of creating an exception, the IAAF really ought to bring cross-country to a three-race “tour” of Norway, Iceland, or Switzerland in the traditional winter and spring months to officially sanction a 10K national team permit series (to supplement their current one). With drug testing and sponsorship to finance, it would meet all necessary criteria for Olympic inclusion that way, and would allow African nations to be better represented at the Winter Games.

Thelma Wright of Canada agrees (she sits on the IAAF XC panel), and is pushing hard for Vancouver to host NACAC (or Pan-Am) XC first, then Worlds eventually, so it can be done.

With World XC every two years now, the insertion of an Olympic XC event would catapult the sport back into the spotlight.

Moreover, professional athletics could also benefit from an all-discipline sports standing, that factors trail and road performance alongside track monetary purses. That way athletes would have more of an incentive to compete in a range of races to earn coveted prizes.

There is a lot that COULD be done, but many of the necessary actors to make it happen already have their hands full.

Squire: Cross country is a sport in which the venue has as much or more personality as the competitors. After writing this book, is there a course that you’ve never been to that you really want to run on?

Hutchinson: Holyrood Park, Edinburgh, Scotland. Or racing Wimbledon Common [London], as I’ve visited but never competed there.

Squire: Final question: if you could go back in time and watch just one race which appears in your book, which one would it be?

Hutchinson: Pre and Lindgren in 1969 at the first PAC-8 XC Conference Champ. The best race Garry Hill ever saw (editor of Track and Field News). Would’ve been amazing to see live.

December 3, 2017

Tim Ritchie Wins First National Title in Thrilling Fashion

Tim Ritchie ran a patient race and ultimately blasted past early leader Parker Stinson to win his first national title in Sacramento.

December 3, 2017

Sara Hall Wins U.S. Marathon Title in Dominant Fashion

Running her second marathon in five weeks, Sara Hall crossed the finish line in Sacramento in 2:28:10 to become the 2017 U.S. Marathon Champion.

December 2, 2017

A Fun New Quirk to Elite Running Prize Money

Road races have been conducted more or less the same way for decades, so it’s promising to see any sort of innovation in the space.

That’s why it was exciting to see the bib displacement bonus system that the California International Marathon set up for the American athletes competing at tomorrow’s USATF Marathon Championships.

Here’s a brief description of how it works:

All the elite runners have been assigned bib numbers, #1 for the top man and woman on down.

Here are the top ten bib numbers in the men’s and women’s races:

For every place an athlete overperforms their bib number, they will earn a $100 bonus in addition to the standard prize purse. For instance, if the athlete wearing bib #10 finishes in ninth place, they will receive a $100 bonus. If that athlete finishes in eighth place, they’ll get $200. If that athlete wins, they’ll get a $900 bib displacement bonus, plus the $20,000 first place prize.

Athletes can only receive displacement bonuses by finishing in the top ten. Bibs #11 and up all start will the value of 11.

Here’s a visual representation of how it would work:

 

In any case, it’s a fun quirk to the elite race that should bring a little extra excitement to race day. Dark horses who might be underestimated coming in get an extra reward for overcoming the more seasoned veterans ranked ahead of them. The extra cash also gives runners an extra bit of incentive in a tight finish.

December 2, 2017

Something In The Water: Episode 1 – Speed River According to Dave Scott-Thomas

Dave Scott-Thomas takes us through the evolution of the Speed River Track Club over the years and how it became a powerhouse.

December 1, 2017

Five Storylines to Watch at the USATF Marathon Championships

With Sacramento and the California International Marathon set to host the USATF Marathon Championships for the first time, here are a few storylines for Sunday’s race worth keeping your eye on.

Stay tuned to CITIUS MAG throughout the weekend as we provide comprehensive coverage of the marathon. As always, click onto CitiusMag.com, and follow us on Twitter and Instagram for behind the scenes content from race weekend.

The Hall factor

Sara Hall surprised a lot of people when she announced her intention to run at CIM just five weeks after setting a personal marathon at the Frankfurt Marathon. Though we know Hall has attempted unthinkable doubles in the past (she finished 20th at the World Cross Country Championships just 13 days after her debut marathon), two marathons in such a short timeframe is a relatively unprecedented.

On paper, a fresh Hall would certainly be the race favorite. But if she’s not quite 100%, things could open up for the likes of Janet Bawcom and Lauren Totten.

A wide open men’s field

It’s hard to put your finger on a favorite in the men’s race.

Sure, there are guys like Nick Arciniaga and Fernando Cabada who have fast PR’s in their back pocket but whose best races are likely behind them.

If you had to go with the guy with the hot hand, the smart money is on Danny Tapia. The Northern California native set his half marathon personal best three weeks ago, running 63:35 for the win at the Monterey Bay Half Marathon. That’s coming off an impressive third place finish at CIM a year ago when he set his marathon PR of 2:12:28.

As for the two main marathon debutants in the men’s race, it’s a tale of two half marathon tune-ups. George Alex, the former University of Oklahoma standout, ran a solid effort to win the Rock n Roll San Jose Half in 63:40. Oregon Duck turned Saucony pro Parker Stinson, meanwhile, struggled at the same Monterey Bay Half Tapia won, managing just 66:44 for ninth place. While half marathons are by no means the end-all for marathon performance, it’s always preferable to come off a good performance than a bad one.

USA Running Circuit standings on the line

There’s a lot of money on the line as Sunday’s marathon also serves as the concluding race on the 2017 USA Running Circuit. For those unfamiliar, the circuit is a series of road races ranging in distance from one mile to the marathon. Runners accrue points for each top ten finish at circuit events, with those earning the most points receiving prize money at the end of the series.

On the men’s side, both Tim Ritchie and Jon Grey enter CIM sitting in the top ten of the 2017 circuit standings and could improve their positions with a strong performances.

Meanwhile, Sara Hall current sits fifth in the women’s standings. If she finishes fifth or better on Sunday, she jumps into second place, an upgrade of $12,500 in prize money.

See the complete USA Running Circuit standings here.

Just how many Olympic Trials qualifiers?

We found out this week from my colleague Scott Olberding’s statistical analysis that 25% of all women’s Olympic Trials Marathon qualifiers ran their marks at CIM. It’s a pretty remarkable figure.

It brings up the question — how many OT qualifiers will we see on Sunday? With a vast swath of sub-elites entered and damn near perfect weather forecasted, it’s safe to say we’re going to see a lot.

Two potential qualifiers of note are Sabrina and Regina Lopez. If you’ve never heard of them, they are twins sisters from Southern California both chasing the dream of making it to the 2020 Olympic Trials start line. From Jorge & Ed Torres to Jim & Joe Rosa to Miki & Lisa Barber, we’ve seen successful twin pairings in track and field, but to see twin sisters both run Trials qualifiers in the same race would be pretty neat.

The weather = perfect

Recent CIM races have seen their share of questionable weather — spanning from the pouring rain to the ridiculously frigid.

Luckily, as of Thursday night, the weather forecast for Sunday morning is pretty damn perfect — a high of 57 degrees (and an estimated low 40’s at start time), light wind, and just a 10% chance of rain.

That means an opportunity to chase some PR’s, if runners choose to push the pace.

Race footage of the USATF Marathon Championships will be archived by USATF.TV here

Scroll to top