Like Us On Facebook
Facebook Pagelike Widget

TOP NEWS

April 13, 2018

It’s Finally Here: The Marathon Matchup We’ve All Been Waiting For

The U.S. women’s field for the 2018 Boston Marathon includes nearly every major contender for the 2020 U.S. Olympic marathon team at this point.

April 9, 2018

LANE 9 – Remember His Name: Erick Kiptanui Runs 5th-Fastest Half Marathon Of All Time In Berlin

Chris and Scott break down all the weekend’s best and worst action. This weekend, Erick Kiptanui became the 5th fastest half marathoner ever.

April 5, 2018

Everyone Needs a Rival: Assigning An Enemy To Every Division I Track Team

In this week’s Thursday Morning Trackstravaganza and Field Frenzy by Jesse Squire, he assigned a rival to every Division I Track and Field team in the U.S.

April 3, 2018

The Speed Project 2018: A Photo Essay of a 340-Mile Journey From Los Angeles to Las Vegas

We hit the road from Los Angeles to Las Vegas to witness 40+ teams take on the harsh task of running a 340-miles relay race called The Speed Project.

April 2, 2018

Lane 9: Sydney McLaughlin Had Quite The Excellent Weekend

Chris and Scott recap all of the weekend’s track and field action including Sydney McLaughlin’s 22.39 200m, 50.07 400m and 49.45 4×4 split.

April 1, 2018

The Alberto Salazar ESPN 30 For 30 Documentary You’ve Been Waiting For

“Bad Boys For Life: The Story of Alberto And Diddy.” The film will follow Sean “P. Diddy” Combs and his effort to run the 2003 ING New York City Marathon.

March 27, 2018

First Things First: A New Citius Mag Video Series – First Guest: Robby Andrews

First Things First gives viewers an inside look at elite athletes training in Flagstaff while eating hamburgers and answering questions at the same time.

March 26, 2018

Examining Geoffrey Kamworor’s Swagger Levels & More

We delve into some of the weekend’s best action including Geoffrey Kamworor’s 13:01 split at the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships.

March 22, 2018

The Biggest Upsets in NCAA Track And Field History (Plus the Weekend’s Best Matchups)

In the spirit of March Madness, here are the biggest upsets in the history of college track and field and came up with a list across a variety of events.

March 20, 2018

Assessing Orlando As The 2020 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials Host

As part of our series evaluating the cities competing to host the 2020 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials, we’re assessing the Orlando bid.

March 15, 2018

Five Ways Track Fans Can Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, plus The Weekend’s Best Matchups

St. Patrick’s Day is coming up on Saturday. How can you as a track fan and/or runner, more sedately celebrate St. Patrick’s Day?

March 8, 2018

Your Roadfood Guide to Indoor Championship Weekend

One of my goals whenever I travel is to find good roadfood. If I can find just one it’s a successful trip. What do I mean by “roadfood”?

March 5, 2018

Why is a tiny island better at marathons than our entire continent?

At the 2018 Tokyo Marathon, 9 Japanese runners ran sub-2:10 with 6 of them placing top 10. How is the country beating USA at developing top marathoners?

March 1, 2018

Why Conference Championships Are The Best

The beauty of conference championship season is that everyone acts out Bo Schembechler’s words: the team, the team, the team.

February 28, 2018

Shelby Houlihan’s Focus

Shelby Houlihan gives us a look at how she went from injured in January to a U.S. champion and now a world indoor championship medal contender.

February 26, 2018

Mt. Rushmore of U.S. Women’s Marathoners: Did Amy Cragg Just Snag A Spot?

Amy Cragg clocked a personal best of 2:21:42 at the Tokyo Marathon so does that put her among the greats on the Mt. Rushmore of U.S. Marathoning?

February 21, 2018

Katie Nageotte On Her Road to Her First U.S. Title: “It Still Doesn’t Feel Real”

Jesse Squire chats with 2018 U.S. Indoor Track and Field Champion Katie Nageotte on her breakthrough performances and her career track.

February 19, 2018

The Scenes and Emotions of the 2018 USATF Indoor Championships

R.J. McNichols gets behind the camera for CITIUS MAG at the USATF Indoor Championships this weekend to capture the emotions of athletes headed to Worlds.

February 16, 2018

Quamel Prince Is The Unsponsored Underdog You Should Root For At USAs

Get to know Quamel Prince: the 23-year-old who never qualified for NCAAs and has broken 1:48 a grand total of once in his life.

February 12, 2018

Winter Olympics: Where did these sports come from?

Coming up with a short back story for some Winter Olympic sports. Sit back and watch us set flames to the annals of history.

February 5, 2018

CITIUS MAG Track Club Singlets Unveiled – Vote Now for the Best Design

We have decided to unveil the three designs of the CITIUS MAG Track Club singlets and put them up for a vote for which kit we will rock in 2018.

February 5, 2018

How far does Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson Long Jump in Skyscraper?

How far can The Rock long jump in the Skyscraper movie? Mike Powell’s long jump world record is 8.95 m (29 ft 4¼ in) from 1991.

February 3, 2018

Watch 2018 Millrose Games Online: Live Stream, TV Channel Info, Schedule

How to watch the 2018 Millrose Games online: live stream, TV information, schedule, live results and more from New York City.

February 1, 2018

Cross Country in the Olympics? Yes, please.

For all the talk about “edgy” and “extreme”, the kind of Olympic cross country that would benefit our sport is old-school.

January 30, 2018

501 American Sub-Four Minute Milers: Where They Ran

Data nerd Scott Olberding created a map that shows where all 501 of the U.S. sub-four minute milers ran their first sub-4.

January 26, 2018

We Have Two Big Announcements

As we approach the first birthday of CITIUS MAG, we wanted to create a formal way for loyal readers to support us, if they so choose.

January 14, 2018

Citius Mag’s first and last article about LaVar Ball

This is the first and the last article that will be written about LaVar Ball on CITIUS MAG but please imagine what he would be like for running.

January 10, 2018

Thursday Reminder Indoor Track Exists

Jesse Squire brings you a look at the best early season indoor track performances and what to look ahead at for this upcoming weekend.

January 4, 2018

Andrew Wheating Says Farewell To Professional Running

Two-time U.S. Olympian and three-time NCAA champion Andrew Wheating announced his retirement from professional track and field in a lengthy Facebook post.

January 2, 2018

Welcome to CITIUS MAG in 2018

We’re back for another year of shenanigans in running while also bringing you the most fun and engaging running-related content on the internet.

December 31, 2017

2017 Comeback Season Awards

In our current epoch of rap music, it can feel as if every single day is “Comeback Season” (or COMEBACK SZN, or CMBK SZN, or some other variation of dropping vowels, consonants, etc). This is silly to me for a few reasons. The most clear being the thought that a single day can constitute a season. A season is god damn season. We have four of them. I’m using “We” in the universal way because we are all bound by seasons because we exist on the same time-space continuum. So when I’m scrolling through Instagram and see my peers shouting CMBK SZN day after day, I want to slap them with a calendar and shout back “JULIUS CAESAR DIDN’T DIE SO YOU COULD DISRESPECT HIS SEASONS”.

The other reason, and perhaps the more fascinating, CMBK SZN is dumb as hell is the majority people claiming it’s their comeback never had a chance of failing. It’s mainly used by people who have experienced incredible success while entertaining a zero-chance possibility of ever returning to a place where a comeback is necessary.

Also, Can we agree it was Aubrey “Drake” Graham who started this phenomena? It seems like it was Drake. It had to have been Drake. 100% Aubrey Graham. 

Drake saying he is having a comeback season is like Matt Centrowitz claiming it’s his comeback season after winning an Olympic Gold. Something I have no proof of, but something I’ve never been so sure of in my life.

Ok, so the gist is no one can see who really enjoys a comeback season because of all the noise from people who hold a false narrative of oppression and failure. I believe two people in the world of running enjoyed a true “Comeback Season”.

Sara Hall

In 2016, Sara Hall dropped out of the Olympic Marathon Trials. Her chance at making her first Olympic team vanished. I also dropped out of the Olympic Marathon Trials, but I wasn’t that devastated because I had a bunch of friends there and my focus immediately shifted to tacos and Coronas. I’m sure she was devastated because she had an honest shot at making the team. We were at different places in our life, and that was fine.

Sara Hall needed a comeback season in 2017. She delivered one with a personal bests in the half marathon, marathon, and a national championship in the marathon.

Her 69:37 performance at the Copenhagen Half Marathon set her up nicely for a 2:27:21 marathon personal best at the Frankfurt Marathon. To cap off her legitimate CMBK SZN, she dominated the U.S Marathon Championships while taking the victory earlier this month.

THIS *CLAP EMOJI* WAS  *CLAP EMOJI* A *CLAP EMOJI* COMEBACK

Chris Derrick

This may seem like a stretch, and it probably is, but I think CD had a 2017 Comeback Season. After a year where he missed the start of the Olympic Marathon Trials due to injury and then couldn’t get into the shape he needed to be in to truly compete at the 10,000-meter Trials, one of our brightest talents was facing some hardships. This is the part of the story where he holes himself up in a room, literally takes out his degree from Stanford, hangs in on the wall, and creates an algorithm for success in 2017.

His formula worked – delivering personal bests at the New York City Half Marathon (61:12) and then guiding him to a 2:12:50 marathon debut (2nd American) at the Chicago Marathon. Chris showed he has a future in the marathon and formulas. Hell yeah, Chris.

I hope I showed not everyone can equally experience a Comeback Season. You cannot have a Comeback Season after one or two bad races. No – you have to suffer through a year of shit to deserve a Citius Comeback Season Award Tour Award. I apologize to Sara and Chris if I made their 2016 year out to be worse than it was. Because, in reality, it was probably a great year filled with family, friends, and all that nice stuff. We probably attribute too much “success” to running, but whatever. We can tackle that in 2018.

December 24, 2017

Christmas Wishes: The Matchups We Want to See in 2018

These are the the races and match-ups that we want to see from the track and field community in 2018 – a year without a world championship or Olympics.

December 21, 2017

I ate Donald Trump’s McDonald’s dinner and then ran: Here are the sad results

Ryan Sterner decided to try and eat President Donald Trump’s dinner of two Big Macs, two Filet-O-Fish and a chocolate shake from McDonalds before running.

December 19, 2017

CITIUS MAG – Quote of the Year: ‘FUCK YES’

Just two words by Shalane Flanagan perfectly captured the emotions surrounding one of the best moments of the year for U.S. distance running.

December 18, 2017

What happened this weekend? Yuki Kawauchi Had A Better Year Than Most U.S. Marathoners

Japanese marathoner Yuki Kawauchi may have put together a better year of running the marathon than the top American runners.

December 7, 2017

The Beauty and Carnage of the Marathon

I haven’t come within 10 miles of running the marathon distance. I have, however, spent the last month of my life basically bathing in the marathon culture. I was at the finish line of the New York City Marathon when Shalane did the damn thing. And I spent last weekend hobnobbing around Sacramento for the 35th California International Marathon with a press credential hanging around my neck granting me more access than I rightfully deserved.

From the outside looking in, the whole point of a marathon for most people was to just finish. If that’s the case, then a marathon was only a few steps removed from being a hot dog eating contest. There had to be more.

When I got to the starting line of the CIM it was still dark, not yet 6 AM. The PA was blaring Imagine Dragons at a skull-shattering volume, but no one seemed to mind.

I caught whiffs of conversations — stories of preparation or lack thereof. There were runners sitting on the curb, applying what my nose positively identified as Icy Hot, or some other menthol knock-off. But Icy Hot wasn’t the only goo. I saw runners rubbing various shmears and semi-solids into any nook or cranny that carried even a scintilla of a doubt about its ability to stay chafe-free. I’m positive most of the product names ended in GLIDE.  Overall, the atmosphere was jovial. Selfie sticks and chuckling and groups in matching t-shirts abound.

The only place where things felt panicked, maybe even desperate, was near the port-o-potties.

In New York, I heard rumors of the Verrazano Bridge running yellow with urine by the time the 50,000 some runners clear the area. In Sacramento, the announcer repeatedly warned people to please respect the neighbors and keep their pre-race ones and twos in the port-o-potties.

I imagine the warning provided a chicken and egg type moment for some of the more refined folks. Had the thought of skipping the line and shitting in someone’s yard occurred to them before the announcer made them privy to the practice?

My assignment for the race was to sit in the elite women’s lead van and observe. We had the back doors swung wide open for maximum visibility and relied on bungee cords stretched within an inch of their lives to keep them ajar.

The marathon doesn’t really get interesting until the element of disaster knocks on the door. This starts to happen at roughly mile ten. And since both men and women started at the same time, the women’s lead van was a perfect vantage point for the back-of-the-pack men’s race (also, Sara Hall was the only female runner we saw that day, as she ended up winning by over two whole minutes).

Now, I’ve seen folks having bad races before: someone maybe 30 seconds behind at the end of a steeplechase or having a little lie down at the end of a 10K. But nothing compares to the face of a marathoner having a bad day. Waking up in the middle of mile 16 and realizing that you, covered in salt, mouth like a dried sponge, still have ten miles to go is probably something not too far off from a religious experience.

We passed runners with sullen, lifeless faces, the skin around their eyes a bright pink that gave the impression of a freshly powdered corpse. I watched one guy try to suck whatever he could out of a GU packet and then nearly vomit it back up. Around mile 20 we passed a man covered in his own filth. Later we learned he had shit his pants at mile eight and went on to run somewhere around 2:16. A pretty decent trade-off, if you ask me.

We passed the runners who called it quits. Some sitting on the curb holding an ailing body part, others walking with their hands on their hips, looking for answers in the pavement beneath their feet. When we went by our driver apologized for not being able to pick them up, but assured them that the “meat wagon” was coming.

Other people we passed were having far more impressive outings. There were runners who, at mile 20, looked like they had just started their engines. They had the wide-eyed look of an animal in a trap, probably hungry, probably closer to death than they knew but running with a ravenous energy in an attempt to jump-start their depleted limbs.

And then there was the finish line.

Some people were jubilant, but most just kind of stopped running — like Forrest Gump in the end zone. They had vacant looks on their faces, stood bleary and blinking, coming to terms with the trauma they had just inflicted on their bodies.

At the end of it all, while we CITIUS boys were making our way back to the elite athlete area, I looked at them and without a hint of irony said, “I’m tired.”

We sat around drinking coffee in the cafeteria as the elite runners started to filter in. Limping, wet, perhaps in shock, we greeted a handful of them, spoke earnestly with the ones we knew and congratulated anyone that approached our table.

I couldn’t pretend to understand what they went through. A washed-up runner cursing his cramped calves after a 5K fun run, and a woman who can’t walk up stairs because she brought her body to the brink and continued to burn are two completely different things.

I now understand the fundamental difference between running marathons and running anything shorter. There didn’t look to be anything inherently fun about running a marathon. Stringing together a good training block can be fun. But the fun really isn’t in the 20 mile long runs or the solo workouts in the pitch black morning. The fun is filling in those consecutive days in the running log, maybe enjoying a beer afterward and feeling like you earned it.

Any fun you were probably having wears off somewhere between a week before the race and right before the gun goes off. I saw the faces of every elite athlete before the start. Existential dread could be one way to describe it, a duck on the pond could be another.

A lot of fuss was made about the bathrooms in the elite staging area. These 100 or so elite athletes were all fawning over the 20 pristine port-o-potties they had to themselves. If you’re engaging in a supposedly fun activity but the best thing you can say about it is that the bathrooms were great, maybe you should reconsider your definition of fun.

The entertainment value of a marathon — the crux of this entire thing — is best compared, I think, to the episode of Seinfeld called “The Dealership.”

Do you remember? This is the episode where Kramer and some poor schmuck of a salesman see how far they can take the car before it runs out of gas.

In the beginning, the car salesman doesn’t understand what Kramer is doing. He’s nervous. Agitated, even.

“How low are you gonna go?”

“Oh, I’ve been below the slash a number of times. This is nothing. Just put it out of your mind.”

Eventually, the car salesman comes around, screaming that he’s never felt so alive, that they can’t stop now, that they need to see how far this thing goes on empty. To him, it was life-changing.

That’s the only reasonable answer I could come up with. The fun isn’t in the act itself but seeing what you can find on your way to the bottom of the well. Maybe it’s a gear you never knew existed. Maybe it’s a dark place where you question every decision you ever made. But in the end, if you make it to the end, you’ll have accomplished something. Was it fun? Was it worth it? I guess that’s for you to decide.

After the race, I hung around Sacramento waiting for my flight, feeling inadequate. All around me people had just participated in a facet of the running world that I was only partner to. It was a self-imposed exile, I suppose, as nothing is stopping me from running a marathon other than thinking that I might die if I tried. But slowly, over the hours waiting for my plane, I made up my mind. I became Kramer’s car salesman: bearing witness to this crazed phenomenon, I desperately wanted to partake and see, finally, how far I could go before the needle breaks off.

November 27, 2017

Scott Fauble is starting a movement. And yes, it has to do with burritos.

Scott Fauble details his obsession with burritos, Mexican food and how you can join his movement. It all started at Boulevard Tacos.

November 27, 2017

The Blue Collar Runner: An oral history

This is a story of a blue collar runner, 30 beers, a Fourth of July parade, and a neverending march towards glory. It all started…

November 20, 2017

PHOTOS: 2017 NCAA Cross Country National Championship

Check out our photo gallery of shots from the 2017 NCAA Cross Country National Championships captured by Brandon Sotelo in Louisville, Kentucky.

November 16, 2017

Wood Report: NCAA Cross Country Championship Men’s Team Projections

Isaac Wood crunched the numbers and has crowned a winner for the 2017 NCAA Cross Country National Championship. Who did he pick?

Scroll to top